Folk Costumes


I took so many photos at the National Folk Museum that I’m now regretting how long it will take to post them, so I’m just going to post some of them and group them together by categories.  I’ll start with my love of textiles, so I hope you enjoy these as much as I did:

traditional split crotch pantaloons, worn under hanbok
traditional split crotch pantaloons, worn under hanbok
A really lovely piece - sheer, and handwoven hanbok jacket
A really lovely piece - sheer, and handwoven hanbok jacket
The commoner mans hanbok.
The commoner man's hanbok.

Note the piecework to create.  I find the construction here interesting, because they managed to avoid the joining of non-rectilinear pieces with gussets, as is common in other cultures with handwovens.

look closely at this photo and note there is something underneath this jacket
look closely at this photo and note there is something underneath this jacket
these rattan woven vests were worn to keep the cloth away from the body and allow more airflow between the ramie or cotton garments and the skin during the sub-tropical hot summers
these rattan woven vests were worn to keep the cloth away from the body and allow more airflow between the ramie or cotton garments and the skin during the sub-tropical hot summers
the same cooling principle was used around the wrists
the same cooling principle was used around the wrists
in the winter, the same clothing style was batted and quilted.  the white jacket here was a 100 stitches jacket - a childs first jacket, with special significance placed around 100.  In Korea they have a big party for a child on their 100th day after birth.  I assume this was because child mortality was a problem in ancient times.
in the winter, the same clothing style was batted and quilted. the white jacket here was a "100 stitches" jacket - a child's first jacket, with special significance placed around 100. In Korea they have a big party for a child on their 100th day after birth. I assume this was because child mortality was a problem in pre economic-developement times.
for added warmth, these fur-lined vests were worn on top
for added warmth, these fur-lined vests were worn on top

I have seen these at the market, and I absolutely MUST get one.  Nuevo hanbok styles are very much in vogue, as is the fur-lined thing in winter.  The modern versions of these are very very chic…

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s