Bo


Umm,  a good example of well I manage my time…

I wonder how much K-Indie music springs from the loins of returnee gyopos like Bowhang…

She’s got such a solid background of influences under her, she just seems richer and more conversant than the other Indie Rockers I’ve been listening to today.

Advertisements

12 thoughts on “Bo

  1. thought i’d share this awesome guitar player from south africa ..was great to meet you last may at art sonje resilience showing..

  2. Hi M.Moon!!!!!

    I’m so glad you checked in! It was really nice connecting with you there. (actually, that’s really rare – I generally hate talking with adoptees) I’m sorry you’re not here to hang out with…

    I’ve actually been blown away by this video in the past and was sad to lose it, so thanks for sharing.

    And kudos for knowing how to upload videos in a comment. :)

  3. a short but sweet connection it was.. i got pulled away from art sonje right after the movie by a friend who i met in korea back in 2006, but really should of hung out with you and the adoptee activists..i kick myself for that.
    Why do you “generally hate talking with adoptees” ?

    oh btw nice job on the art piece for national assembly.. i left korea shortly before you guys started on it but i would have been there sweating along with you guys.

    it seems to me we (adoptees) need to get more radical about shifting korean societies views of adoption(abduction) and unwed mothers! i am some what annoyed how cocky the korean people are about their culture/nationalism yet cannot or will not take care of their own children and women. i have more respect for japan and n.korea more often than the rok.. g8 summit in the rok?give me a break! what hypocrites!
    startin to ramble on…has nothing to do with this post..

    whats your email? maybe more appropriate instead of me babbling on your comments page.

    sorry i’m not there to hang out too! but i can only handle limited amounts of everything korean.. especially the language which i cannot for the life of me appreciate which leads to dropping any idea of re-learning it..
    actually i love the country side and most small towns i drove thru once escaping seoul lunacy.

    whats your email address?

  4. I’ll respond to a couple of things in your comment (just because others may wonder the same thing) and then email you later as well.

    Why do you “generally hate talking with adoptees” ?

    Probably for the same reason you can only handle limited amounts of everything Korean…ha ha ha!
    But seriously, I can only process sooo many adoption stories.

    Most of the adoptees who come to Korea are in their early 20’s and wear their adoption like pretentious college kids wear their latest philosophy du jour. They just aren’t thinking critically about themselves. A lot of them are defensive about their privileges and in gratitude mode.

    So if everything is perfect, why are you here? And why are you so tense???

    All the stories – good and bad – point to a larger picture, which a lot of them refuse to look at. The stock answer is: I guess I was lucky.

    I just get tired of how black and white the sophomore adoptee thinks – how they try to shove everything into their world view instead of honestly trying to expand their view. This is also a big social adventure for them, and a fun new fraternity of mutually dysfunctional support. So they’re always about the next drink at the next cool club and the possibility of hooking up with someone to complete the giddy Korea joy ride tour.

    Adoptees coming to Korea are naturally having an intense experience, and that’s fine if you’re visiting for a couple weeks, but since I live here I don’t necessarily want to keep having the intensity amped up every time I meet an intense adoptee. It’s a nice(?) place to visit, but you can’t live there all the time.

    Well, the activists live there (intense land) all the time – and I just can’t do that. I am learning late in life that I can’t handle excess. Food, drink, conversation, information…I’ve become more sensitive as my tread is pretty worn down. It’s just not healthy for me.

    Getting radical – well, I’d love to do that. But one has to measure what is effective or not. It gets attention here but doesn’t change hearts and minds, which is where the real battle is. Because our voice is marginalized, we have to be careful not to be too offensive. (I should ask one of the Transracial Abductees who lives in Korea about that. Here we’re not transracial OR abductees. We’re just ingrates.) Anyway, Koreans are always telling us our message doesn’t work. But on the other hand, if we operate the way they tell us to, nothing will get changed for another hundred years. And we adoptees living here are tired of being asked to do circus tricks just so we can get a second of air play. So we’re always open to new ideas. We need to find a way to get viral amongst Koreans, but it’s hard when we can’t speak the language and are barred from Korean community, and those sympathetic are so swamped with Korean social issues, they haven’t enough hours or lives to accomplish all they want to do. (And this week one sympathetic Korean is asking us adoptees to once again put on some ridiculous stunt to get airplay – we are just a freak show for exploitation) Plus, education is such a daunting proposition. We’re working on getting more succinct, but it’s just too complex an issue. And, there is the burnout factor. There are also limits to what we can do, because we can’t risk getting deported.

    I think external criticism is also great. I wish all of America would ask Korea – What kind of people throw away their own children? It shoved the dog eating underground for a while and it is greatly reduced now. A reduction due to awareness (even for the wrong reasons) would be a great gain. Because in its absence, alternatives will be explored.

    Modernity IS creating feminists here who will hopefully recognize that this is all part of the oppression of women, so the climate is changing. I just don’t want to wait for two or three generations and another 20,000 children turned into paper orphans.

    TRACK under Jane’s leadership is doing (in my opinion) all the right things – with Korean advisers, working within Korean politics, writing in Korean to Koreans, and making most of their public campaigns all about education, and forming a coalition of allies. She’s done a couple of things which were provocative and effective, but those were at the very limits of public tolerance. It’s just not wise to go further than that or we risk alienating Korea, but they were necessary actions at the time. So we have to fight against being pitied while at the same time pointing out how Korea needs to change? Who do we think we are? We are essentially upstarts and offensive by speaking up at all. So the challenge is to be convincing but not antagonizing. But first we need to get our turn at the mike – and that’s nearly impossible in a foreign country, in a language you can’t speak. In the past year there’s been an unprecedented breakthrough of adoptees in Korean media, and the bulk of it is due to the writing of TRACK members.

    Radical in Korea is different as well. Radicals in Korea get large groups to cripple the machine from within. Because we’re not a part of any machine and not a large group, there’s nothing we can cripple by protest or strike. The only radical acts by individuals that seem to move people is the death of one of their own. So a KAD martyr isn’t really going to accomplish anything here. Things outside of group mentality are inconsequential. The only thing of consequence here is money or power, none of which we have. Adoption agencies like Holt, however, came to Korea at a time when even a little foreign money was huge and the power that bought has grown exponentially over the years and has deep roots.

    The Ministry of Health, Welfare and Family didn’t want to speak to the BBC’s Ellen Otsen about adoption because “it’s a sensitive time.” To me that message is clear: they can’t risk exposing their bias toward the adoption agencies and their non-compliance with the Hague Convention before the upcoming G20. Every radical in Korea is being shut down right now, with the right to assemble a joke and people deciding whether or not they will risk their livelihood and go to jail to express themselves in a free and democratic manner which isn’t really going to be allowed during the G20.

    There are so many pressing issues in Korea that affect Koreans in their own homes, that we exported and denied children are low on the list of priorities to attend to. I think the Korean government is only concerned about adoption because the Korean population is endangered, and Koreans are mostly only concerned about adoption in regards to preserving a way out of shame.

    If there was some way for me to express to Koreans how the real shame they should be concerned with is the lengths Koreans will go to preserve their image, then I would die a happy woman.

    Ooops – sorry about the rambling!

  5. I hope to see a Hines Ward among adpotees. When an adoptee earns the nobel prize for his naturalized country instead of his birthplace, then Korea will wakes up to the fact that they are giving away her most valuable asset.
    “I think external criticism is also great. I wish all of America would ask Korea – What kind of people throw away their own children?” I don’t think that would ever happen because the western world are all too happy to exploit and the current system was implemented when Korea was at her weakest and still saves Korea billions in social services. The real solution will have to start within Korea and I think TRACK is on the right track. :)

  6. All of these are great posts – I just wanted to say that I learn as much reading your blog (both your writing and others’) as I do in school. Love you

  7. @ M Moon,
    “but i can only handle limited amounts of everything korean.. especially the language which i cannot for the life of me appreciate which leads to dropping any idea of re-learning it..”
    Can you explain to me what you mean by this?

  8. “I hope to see a Hines Ward among adpotees. When an adoptee earns the nobel prize for his naturalized country instead of his birthplace, then Korea will wakes up to the fact that they are giving away her most valuable asset.”

    Yes and no. Unfortunately, adoptee success only reinforces the Korean idealization/rationalization that the children they’ve thrown away have gone to a better life. They don’t realize that the (now not really true) better opportunities come at a huge price for us. And they hold this expectation up to all us adoptees. They view all of us who aren’t PH.D’s, doctors, lawyers, or famous as somehow defective failures. Of course, being thrown away is never a handicap and has nothing to do with difficulty being successful…If we were to become so hugely successful, that would be fodder for adoption agencies to say to moms in tough spots, “See? X went on to fame and fortune being sent away. If you keep your little Y you could be depriving him of a life like that.” It wouldn’t matter if we won a gold medal for America – Koreans would still co-opt us as Han and take credit for our blood…We really can’t win here. It’s either be grateful or please shut up and don’t make us look in a mirror.

    “I think external criticism is also great. I wish all of America would ask Korea – What kind of people throw away their own children?” I don’t think that would ever happen because the western world are all too happy to exploit and the current system was implemented when Korea was at her weakest and still saves Korea billions in social services. The real solution will have to start within Korea and I think TRACK is on the right track. :)

    Well, the most meaningful and sustainable solution is to change Koreans’ hearts and minds. But shame on the international level doesn’t hurt speeding that along. A few westerners are critical – enough to raise doubt. And it has always been that small doubt raised by a few that has brought about change.

    Ha ha ha. And the adopters are looking more and more crazed these days, so the whole world is debating their motives.

    But yeah, I agree. TRACK has the right idea, shining a light on the source of the problems, trying to fix them and not put up with crappy band-aid solutions.

    My fantasy is the lights would all turn on all around the world with all adult adoptees at one time, and that they would all step forward out of the shadows and we would all descend on the National Assembly – the whole City of Lost Children – and demand an end to this madness.

    But the reality is it takes decades for the light to cut through, and some will go to their graves with hardening of the arteries.

    Sometimes I think Jane’s mom found her and her dad preserved her citizenship just so she could anchor us all firmly in Korean soil. She’s such a strong woman, carrying all us adoptees on her back…

  9. “My fantasy is the lights would all turn on all around the world with all adult adoptees at one time, and that they would all step forward out of the shadows and we would all descend on the National Assembly – the whole City of Lost Children – and demand an end to this madness.”
    What a great idea and along with that BBC reporter.

  10. “And the Asian ideal of Asian ideal is radically different than the western idea of Asian ” So true. I found this to be very disturbing when I immigrated here. I can even expand on this. Many westerners think that Asians are intelligent but uncreative and I thinking to myself, how is that 1/2 the current inventions have its origin in the Far East. We used paper, gunpowder, the compass etc hundreds of year before the western world. We are very creative and intelligent people, just look at the student body at MIT. I am going to stop here before I a break my computer.
    “In addition, the children in Korean orphanages are there because they are older due to bad family circumstances or special needs. Improved social services would greatly reduce the orphanage population. International adoption does little to improve their lot, because most adopting people want infants.” Exactly my point on selfishness. I think adoptive parents use noble phrases as an excuse to fill a void in their lives. Otherwise many of these older children would have been adopted as well. Seldom do people act out of true altruism toward some strangers.
    You know your idea of adoptees descending on the National Assembly may hold some potential. I wonder what they will do if some 25,000 adoptees all show up at once on the steps of the National Assembly with foreign medias? Can this be somehow organized?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s